My career portfolio and thought journals

Conference Season 2014 and Other Exciting News

Conference Season 2014 and Other Exciting News post image

Spring is “conference season” for many people in my discipline. Many of the conferences I regularly attend and present research at are front-loaded in the year, which means I am busy with a lot of travel and preparation until Summer. I have updated my conference activity in various spots on this website, whether it’s continuing education talks, research abstracts that resulted in poster presentations or podium presentations, or committee memberships. I thought since there is such a flurry of activity in a relatively short amount of time, I would post an update in one place, at a minimum to justify my productivity to those around me, but also to provide justification to my wife as to why I am floating all over the US for a few months. You can also see my full list of research, speaking, and committee activity. So, here we go, in order of conference date:

February 2014

American Drug Utilization Review Society (ADURS)
Kyle D. Null. Effectively targeting overuse/abuse and strategies for intervention. Continuing Education program to be presented at the 2014 American Drug Utilization Review Society (ADURS) Annual Symposium. DoubleTree Paradise Valley Resort. Scottsdale, AZ. February 20-22, 2013. CE Presentation

Shannon P. Hardwick, Benjamin F. Banahan, Kyle D. Null, Judith P. Clark. Development and implementation of a Suboxone/Subutex treatment protocol edit. American Drug Utilization Review Society (ADURS) 2014 Symposium. DoubleTree Paradise Valley Resort. Scottsdale, AZ. February 20-22, 2014. ABSTRACT | POSTER

Shannon P. Hardwick, Benjamin F. Banahan, Kyle D. Null, Judith P. Clark. Initial implementation of tablet splitting criteria in electronic prior authorization. American Drug Utilization Review Society (ADURS) 2014 Symposium. DoubleTree Paradise Valley Resort. Scottsdale, AZ. February 20-22, 2014. ABSTRACT | POSTER

March 2014

American Pharmacists Association (APhA)
Erica Rogers, Sean R. King, Kyle D. Null. The influence of functional health literacy on quality patient-pharmacist communication. American Pharmacists Association (APhA) 2014 Annual Meeting and Exposition. Orlando, FL. March 28-31, 2014. ABSTRACT Podium Presentation

April 2014

Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP)
Amod Athavale, Kyle D. Null, Benjamin F. Banahan, III, Judith P. Clark. Defining specialty drugs: An environmental scan and comparison of specialty drug lists. Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) 26th Annual Meeting & Expo. Tampa, FL. April 2-4, 2014. ABSTRACT Podium Presentation PLATINUM AWARD WINNER

David Wamble, Kyle D. Null, Benjamin F. Banahan, III. An application of CDPS for case management selection in a fee-for-service Medicaid sample. Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) 26th Annual Meeting & Expo. Tampa, FL. April 2-4, 2014. ABSTRACT GOLD AWARD WINNER

May 2014

Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA)
Medication Use Safety Workgroup (Co-Chair)
Measure Update Panel

June 2014

International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR)
Zainab Shahpurwala, Kyle D. Null, Judith P. Clark. Multi-opioid, multi-provider use in persons without cancer. International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) 19th Annual International Meeting. Tampa, FL. May 31 – June 4, 2014. ABSTRACT

Manasi Datar, Kyle D. Null, Benjamin F. Banahan III. Evaluation of Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA) Measures Among Medicaid Beneficiaries with Persistent Asthma. International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) 19th Annual International Meeting. Tampa, FL. May 31 – June 4, 2014.

Academy Health
Kyle D. Null, John P. Bentley, Donna West-Strum, Yi Yang. Refining the risk-adjusted capitated payment methodologies for Medicare Part C (CMS-HCC) and Part D (CMS-RxHCC) Plans Using the Medication Exposure Measure (MEM). Academy Health 2014 Annual Research Meeting. San Diego, CA. June 8-10, 2014. Encore Presentation

July 2014

Mississippi Society of Health-System Pharmacists (MSHP)
Kyle D. Null. The Arrival of Biosimilar Drugs in Health-System Pharmacy Practice. Continuing education program to be presented at the 2014 Mississippi Society of Health-System Pharmacists (MSHP) 61st Annual Meeting. Natchez Convention Center & Grand Hotel. Natchez, MS. July 19, 2014. CE

Areas of Interest I Need to Remember (But I Keep Forgetting)

Areas of Interest I Need to Remember (But I Keep Forgetting) post image

There are several research streams that I find fascinating, but I either have not found the time to explore them or, from sheer neglect, I forget that I am even interested in them. Considering 2013 is coming to a close, I’ve also included a few prophetic statements about where research is going or needs to go. We’ll see how 2014 handles these areas. So, without further ado, here is a small list of areas I either want to explore soon or I just simply do not want to forget:

Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS)

I am more interested in the development of CDSS than the outcomes of implementation. The idea that we can incorporate empirically-derived data into decision making is amazing. The fact that it has not been universally adopted in the areas of healthcare where we have truly figured out the role of CDSS I find to be academically disquieting. keep reading…

Guns N’ Roses and the School of Athens

School of Athens (Raphael) juxtaposed with Use Your Illusion I (Guns N’ Roses)

School of Athens juxtaposed with Use Your Illusion I

School of Rock

Growing up, I got into rock music at a relatively early age. I remember being around 6 years old and seeing what I remember to be my first music video by Bon Jovi (it was “You Give Love a Bad Name” for those of you dying to know). I was hooked. A few years later a band called Guns N’ Roses showed up on MTV and my whole world was turned around. It was the video for “Paradise City,” which was shot during a live concert while they were on tour opening for Aerosmith. The song, the sea of faces that filled the stadium, and the swagger of the band in full swing, I knew at that moment that I wanted to play guitar and although I could not fully appreciate it at the time, I started paying particular attention to all of the accoutrements that go along with music: the scene, the emotion, the album artwork. Artwork that accompanies music still enamors me. keep reading…

Sun Herald Newspaper Interview

Sun Herald Newspaper Interview post image

I was recently interviewed for the November 14, 2013 edition of the Sun Herald, a newspaper covering the Biloxi-Gulfport and Mississippi Gulf Coast areas, about an individual’s addiction to prescription pain medicine and his subsequent addiction to Suboxone. During the interview, I was simply told that it was a “famous person from the Gulf Coast.” I kind of figured the interview was about the bass player from Three Doors Down who was charged with vehicular manslaughter earlier this year, but the “individual” turned out to be Michael Grimm, the 2010 winner of “America’s Got Talent.” Since I never really kept up with the show, I was not familiar with him. Although, the story is no longer posted on the Sun Herald’s website – at least I can’t seem to find it anymore – over the last several weeks I have googled my name along with “Sun Herald” and it has been really interesting to see how many news syndicates have picked up the initial story since then.

TLDR: I’m almost famous.

My Research Interests – Explained (Part 1 of n)

My Research Interests – Explained (Part 1 of n) post image

2010 Southern PharmAd Conference

So, What Do You Do Again?

Sometimes I have difficulty in appropriately communicating my research interests and I think that is because they are so varied – everything seems interesting. My Ph.D. is in “Pharmaceutical Sciences” which means nothing to most people. It’s a very broad label that was largely a function of the school consolidating the name of the graduate degrees being granted from 5 or 6 separate programs (e.g., Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology, Pharmacognosy, Pharmaceutics, Pharmacy Administration, etc…). That last one, Pharmacy Administration, is what my Masters and Ph.D. degrees would have been called had I received them before the change. I’m not sure which is less descriptive of what I actually do: Pharmaceutical Sciences or Pharmacy Administration. Maybe all researchers have this qualm with some part of their education or maybe it just helps to feed an esoteric conversation we like having with our colleagues. I’m not sure and I don’t suppose that it matters. keep reading…

Poets, Politicians, and Other Famous Relatives

My Famous Family Tree

So, it turns out that I may have a few “famous” relatives. A few Christmases ago, I was back home in Meridian, MS around my family and the topic of the family tree came up as it often does around Christmas for some reason. I suppose it is a natural time for the family to talk about the family when we are all together and sharing in the holiday spirit and all of that. When my grandparents started discussing their parents, grandparents, war stories and such, I grabbed a pen and paper and started furiously writing down what I could retain without asking them to slow down or repeat themselves. Something I have learned over the last few years: when an older generation starts talking, you should listen. Once you get through some of the uncomfortable memes of yesteryear, there is usually some good advice buried somewhere in the word soup. As they were talking about our family, I scribbled out a rudimentary tree that captured the names and branches I heard them say. If I could not fit someone nicely in the tree, they became a bush on their own until I knew where to connect them to the big tree. keep reading…

All We Need to Do is Make Sure We Keep Talking

Stephen Hawking Keep Talking

Stephen Hawking

For millions of years, mankind lived just like the animals. Then something happened which unleashed the power of our imagination. We learned to talk and we learned to listen. Speech has allowed the communication of ideas, enabling human beings to work together to build the impossible. Mankind’s greatest achievements have come about by talking and its greatest failures by not talking. It doesn’t have to be like this. Our greatest hopes could become reality in the future. With the technology at our disposal, the possibilities are unbounded. All we need to do is make sure we keep talking.
-Stephen Hawking

This is one of my favorite quotes. It was said by Stephen Hawking, the famous theoretical physicist and cosmologist confined to a wheelchair due to his ongoing battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease). ALS is a condition of the nerve cells which control voluntary movement. Eventually, speech is affected. Stephen Hawking speaks using a computer synthesized voice. In the quote, which was first recorded for a British Telecommunications (BT) commercial, he was discussing the impact and importance of communication on advances in society and what the lack of communication can do to a society. keep talking…